Media

Feb 2,  2014

Oceanic Institute, Hawaii to Present at Aquaculture America 2014 Successful Trial of LPC in Pacific White Shrimp Diet

DUCKWEED (LEMNA SPP) PROVIDES A POTENTIAL PROTEIN SOURCE FOR FEEDING PACIFIC WHITE SHRIMP (LITOPENAEUS VANNAMEI)

Dong-Fang Deng* , Zhi Yong Ju, Warren Dominy, Joannie Dobbs, Kenny Marcus, Peter Sherlock

Aquatic Feeds and Nutrition Department, Oceanic Institute, Waimanalo, Hawaii, 96795, USA dfdeng@oceanicinstitute.org)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional values of lemna protein concentrate (LPC), a duckweed protein, as a protein source for shrimp feed. The LPC was produced by Parabel Ltd. Florida, USA. LPC contains 70% crude protein. Menhaden meal was replaced by LPC at increasing levels across seven treatments. The control diet contained 18% fishmeal, 25% soybean meal, 5% squid meal as the major protein sources. All the test diets (containing 35% protein and 8.5% lipid) were manufactured by a pellet mill following a similar protocol used in feed industry. A commercial feed containing 40% protein and 9% lipid was included as a reference diet.

The feeding trial was conducted in a zero water exchange system for 8 weeks, each treatment contained 3 tanks with 100 shrimp allocated per tank, and the average body weight was 2.4 g per shrimp. The average water temperature was 26.1?0.1°C. The results showed that: 1) replacement of fishmeal by LPC did not impair the physical quality of shrimp feed; 2) a low level replacement of fishmeal (16.7% by LPC) increased the growth performance of shrimp; 3) shrimp fed the treatment diet with 50% replacement of fishmeal LPC had the same growth performance as those fed the control diet. Replacement of 100% fishmeal with LPC resulted in a lower growth rate of shrimp (1.8 g/wk), comparing to the growth rate of shrimp fed the control diet (2.4 g/week). However the growth rate achieved in the non-fishmeal treatment is still considered a good growth rate for shrimp in general shrimp culture; especially as current test diet contained less protein than the commercial diet (35% compared to 40%); 4) FCR was negatively affected by higher inclusions of LPC (>50%).) replacement of LPC did not seem to affect the proximate composition (dry matter, protein, lipid and ash content) and the sensory attributes of shrimp tail muscle. The current results demonstrate that LPC is a promising alternative ingredient for use in shrimp feed.

Diet number-FM protein replacement (%) Weight gain(g)/wk Weight gain (%) Survival (%) FCR
Diet 1 0% 2.36 ± 0.05cd 845 ± 9cd 98.3 ± 0.9a 1.02 ± 0.01a
Diet 2 LPC-16.7% 2.45 ± 0.04d 877 ± 13d 98.3 ± 0.9a 1.02 ± 0.01ab
Diet 3 LPC-33.3% 2.31 ± 0.07cd 827 ± 13cd 97.3 ± 1.2a 1.04 ± 0.02ab
Diet 4 LPC-50% 2.13 ± 0.04bc 770 ± 15bc 99.7 ± 0.3a 1.05 ± 0.0.2ab
Diet 5 LPC-66.7% 2.03 ± 0.07ab 734 ± 28ab 97.7 ± 0.7a 1.11 ± 0.02bc
Diet 6 LPC-83.3% 1.91 ± 0.07ab 663 ± 17a 98.0 ± 0.0a 1.16 ± 0.02c
Diet 7 LPC-100% 1.79 ± 0.03a 645 ± 22a 98.0 ± 0.6a 1.17 ± 0.00c
Diet 8 Commercial 2.36 ± 0.06cd 856 ± 25cd 97.3 ± 1.5a 1.03 ± 0.02ab



Sign Up For Newsletter

First Name *

Last Name *

Email Address *


Site Navigationx